My Child May be Addicted to Adderall. Help!

My Child May be Addicted to Adderall. Help!

My Child May be Addicted to Adderall. Help!

Adderall has become pretty common over the years among young adults who suffer from attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Known as combination of amphetamine and dextroamphetamine, it is classified as a stimulant and speeds up the central nervous system. Adderall abuse by teens and young adults is common due to stress and time management issues at college. Many college students depend on Adderall to pull an “all-nighter” to study so they are awake and able to concentrate better. As kids enter their late high school years, they are pressured to pass exams and are also in their experimental stages as young adults. This added stress and anxiety can affect them to where they first turn to the drug and experience its effects.

According to SAMHSA’s National Survey on Drug Use and Health, also called (NSDUH), in 2015, 425,000 teens and adolescents between the ages of 12 and 17 reported misuse of prescription amphetamine drugs like Adderall. This number jumps to approximately 2.5 million among young adults age 18 to 25, which is almost 5 times higher. Young adults using Adderall for recreational purposes have also found to be:

  • 3 times as likely to have used marijuana.
  • 5 times more likely to have misused prescription pain relievers.
  • 8 times as likely to have used cocaine or prescription tranquilizers like Xanax and Klonopin recreationally.


Signs and Symptoms of Adderall Abuse in Young Adults

The symptoms of Adderall use include headaches, increased anxiety, nausea, upset stomach and digestive issues, dry mouth, and reduced appetite. They could also experience restlessness, fatigue, changes in sex drive, insomnia, shortness of breath, pounding or fast heartbeat.


What Can I Do?

You can talk to your loved ones and let them know you are there for them and you are concerned about changes in their moods and well-being. You want to approach this in a calm and non-defensive manner. There is preventative treatment for Adderall abuse. It’s important for your family to educate themselves about addiction and speak to a medical professional for guidance. It’s advisable to monitor all prescriptions at home. Keeping all medication in a safe place so no one can have access to abuse it is recommended.

At Banyan Treatment Center, we offer professional services like inpatient or outpatient treatment which are often necessary for those struggling with Adderall abuse. Excessive stimulant exposure over time and the increase in dopamine levels can cause subtle brain changes that reinforce drug abuse behaviors at which point, it’s difficult to stop on one’s own. For help, please call us at 844-248-4686. We can help find treatment resources for your loved one.

About the Author

Allison Seriani is the National Public Relations Director for Banyan and is a contributor for Banyan’s Blog spot.  She has experience with billing, operations, setting up a facility for proper licensure, consulting, marketing best practices, and public relations.  Have a question?  Email her at

Tasha is a Digital Marketing Specialist at Banyan and is a contributor for Banyan's Blog Spot. She brings years of content writing and blogging to the team.